Mindscaping


“It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves”
-William Shakespeare

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Frequently Asked Questions
What is hypnosis?
How does hypnosis work?
What happens during a visit to the hypnotherapist?
How many sessions will I need?
What illnesses or conditions respond well to hypnosis?
Are there any risks associated with hypnotherapy?
Can Hypnosis make me do something against my will?
Can anyone be hypnotized?





What is hypnosis?

Hypnosis is an altered state of consciousness, which feels like something between sleeping and waking, and has qualities of both these states. In general, hypnotized subjects find that their body is deeply relaxed, almost in a state of sleep, while their subconscious mind becomes very alert. This state of consciousness is what makes hypnosis an excellent tool for unlocking buried memories, or for discovering hidden motives. A hypnotic state can be induced in a number of ways. The therapist may have the patient relax and focus on a spot until the eyes become heavy, or roll the eyes up into the head and then shut them, or imagine that an arm feels lighter and lighter until it seems to float in the air, or fantasize about lying on a beach. What happens next depends on the therapist and the particular problem. One of the most promising aspects of hypnosis is its ability to help some people live with chronic pain, such as that caused by back ailments or cancer. While in trance, patients have learned to escape pain by visualizing themselves in another place or imagining that the aching is numb.

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How does hypnosis work?

Simply put, our minds work on two levels, the conscious and the unconscious. We make decisions, think and act with our conscious mind and there are no emotional problems at the conscious level. The subconscious mind is always working monitoring and affecting all our physical and psychological functions such as blood pressure, hormone levels, hunger, and fatigue, even when we are asleep.� Additionally, the subconscious holds our memories, instincts, behavioural patterns and emotions.� It's here that all emotional problems have their roots. When something happens to us, we remember it and learn a particular behavior in response to what happened. Each time something similar happens, our physical and emotional reactions attached to the memory are repeated. In some cases these reactions are unhealthy. In some forms of hypnotherapy, a trained therapist guides you to remember the event that led to the first reaction, separate the memory from the learned behavior, and replace unhealthy behaviors with new, healthier ones. During hypnosis, your body relaxes and your thoughts become more focused. Like other relaxation techniques, hypnosis lowers blood pressure and heart rate, and changes certain types of brain wave activity. In this relaxed state, you will feel at ease physically yet fully awake mentally and may be highly responsive to suggestion. If you are trying to quit smoking, for example, a therapist's suggestion may help convince you that you will not like the taste of cigarettes in the future. Some people respond better to hypnotic suggestion than others. There are several stages of hypnosis: Reframing the problem Becoming relaxed, then absorbed (deeply engaged in the words or images presented by a hypnotherapist) Dissociating (letting go of critical thoughts) Responding (complying with a hypnotherapist's suggestions) Returning to usual awareness Reflecting on the experience

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What happens during a visit to the hypnotherapist?

During your first visit, you will be asked about your medical history and what brought you in -- what condition you would like to address. The hypnotherapist may explain to you what hypnosis is and how it works. You will then be directed through relaxation techniques, using a series of mental images and suggestions intended to change behaviors and relieve symptoms. For example, people who have panic attacks may be given the suggestion that, in the future, they will be able to relax whenever they want. The hypnotherapist will also teach you the basics of self-hypnosis and give you an audiotape to use at home so you can reinforce what you learn during the session.

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How many sessions will I need?

The number of sessions depends on the nature of your appointment. Usually one or two sessions is enough for most problems. Some people find it relaxing and refreshing and choose to come back once or twice a year. Athletes may chose to have sessions before a big game or tournament just to ensure optimal performance. Phobias, since they are highly irrational and paralyzing fears, may take 3-5 sessions as the client is gradually desensitized to the source of the fear. Clients recieve lessons in self hypnosis as well- usually, all the reinforcement one may need. It does really depend on the client and what they want to work on.

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What illnesses or conditions respond well to hypnosis?

Hypnosis is used in a variety of settings -- from emergency rooms to dental offices to outpatient clinics. Clinical studies suggest that hypnosis may improve immune function, increase relaxation, decrease stress, and ease pain and feelings of anxiety. Hypnotherapy can reduce the fear and anxiety that some people feel before medical or dental procedures. For example, hypnosis may improve recovery time and reduce anxiety as well as pain following surgery. Hypnosis can even speed healing. For severe chronic pain or slow recovery, hypnoreiki may be a better option. Reiki speeds up and activates the bodies natural healing ability while the hypnosis manages the current pain. A hypnotherapist can teach you self-regulation skills. For instance, someone with arthritis may learn to turn down pain like the volume on a radio. Hypnotherapy can also be used to help manage chronic illness. Self-hypnosis can enhance a sense of control, which is often lacking when someone has a chronic illness. Clinical studies on children in emergency treatment centers show that hypnotherapy reduces fear, anxiety, and discomfort. See our services for a better idea of how hypnosis can help you.

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Are there any risks associated with hypnotherapy?

Before considering hypnotherapy, you should get a diagnosis from your doctor to know what needs to be treated. This is especially true if your condition is psychological (for example, a phobia or anxiety), and you should be evaluated by a psychiatrist. The same applies to cases of severe drug dependence- the hypnotherapist should be working accordingly with the rehab program and the client's doctors present.

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Can Hypnosis make me do something against my will?

Absolutely not. This is probably the biggest myth of all. Stage hypnotists seem to make people do strange things while hypnotized, but the truth is that these people are doing these things because they have a desire to be outrageous. If the stage hypnotists chooses their subjects carefully they will have willing participants. You will never do anything, or accept any suggestion that violates your morals or values.

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Can anyone be hypnotized?

Anyone of average intelligence and above can be hypnotized as long as they allow themselves to be. Essentially, all hypnosis is self-hypnosis. How deeply and easily they go into the state of hypnosis, does however vary. As long as the person is comfortable with the process of hypnosis, and trusts the hypnotist they can, and will easily be hypnotized. A person�s ability to focus, concentrate, and respond to the hypnotist will determine the depth of hypnosis that client will achieve. This is why intelligent people tend to be the best hypnotic clients. Statistically, 60% of the population will experience a medium to deep level of trance on their first session. 20% will experience profound depths of hypnosis, and the other 20% will enter a little to medium depth of hypnosis. Behavioral changes like quitting smoking, reducing weight, improving your golf game, and so on can occur even in the lightest depths of hypnosis with the proper motivation.